Sound Pages

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The aural richness of a habitat is a direct measure of its biodiversity. Compari...
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​​Starring Toolangi's finest songbirds...
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Audio by Cofan Tribe Member...
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A non-profit committed to the preservation of quiet...
​​Starring Toolangi's finest songbirds...
The aural richness of a habitat is a direct measure of its biodivers...
Audio by Cofan Tribe Member...

 

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Short loop of ambient jungle or rainforest music for my Roll20 Game.
In every country lockdowns are progressively lifting but it seems that we still have to stay at home a bit longer,...
In every country lockdowns are progressively lifting but it seems that we still have to stay at home a bit longer, its still uncertain for our club scene.

Times are strange. We all have to push ourselves forward digitally in order to maintain a "Social DJ Life," which reveals how our social image and music are intrinsically connected; the status of a DJ becomes instantly meaningless without actual people gathering and communing through music.

With the overflowing amount of information, it is sometimes easy to get lost in an endless consumption of content.

I am of course, also part of this social media game, and thought a bit about what I wanted to present within these messy times, I decided to compile a mix of birds singing to help relaxation.

Now that cities are running at idle speed, nature is slowly coming back through unexpected forms:

Butterflies can live their life without getting hit by a car, plants are retaking what is theirs and birds fly and parade in front of us, not nagging us but just beautifully expressing their freedom.

This mix idealises my dream journey in nature after lockdown, with all its phases, from apprehension to hope.

I hope you, like me, enjoy the original singers of this world.

This includes a recording I made at the botanical garden of Melbourne when I toured Australia in May 2018.

Thank you
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In the hill rainforests of north-eastern Sabah, tiny Bornean Treehole Frogs (Metaphrynella sundana) call to create a...
In the hill rainforests of north-eastern Sabah, tiny Bornean Treehole Frogs (Metaphrynella sundana) call to create a magical nocturnal soundscape.

In order to make their calls as loud as possible, males of this species adjust the frequency of their 'toop' call to match the natural resonance of the small water-filled treehole they live inside. Often a number of males can be heard calling from different sized holes in the same area, creating a delightful soundscape of 'toop' notes at various pitches.
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Sound Portrait of Olympic National Park, Washington, USA.

Features Pacific chorus frogs, a dawn chorus by the...
Sound Portrait of Olympic National Park, Washington, USA.

Features Pacific chorus frogs, a dawn chorus by the Hoh river, huge waves crashing on Rialto beach and a haunting howling sound recorded inside the hollow of a dead Sitka Spruce.
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A vivid dawn chorus from the steamy forests of lowland West Papua. While the rainforest is still dark, Hooded...
A vivid dawn chorus from the steamy forests of lowland West Papua. While the rainforest is still dark, Hooded Butcherbirds sing melodic fluty phrases to welcome the new day. The calls of nocturnal frogs and insects gradually fade as other diurnal species become active. Other species heard on this track include Black-sided Robin, Grey Whistler, Triton Cockatoo and Lesser Bird-of-Paradise.
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6 Minute Mixdown of AMBINATOR Jungle Space "Jungle Camp"
We are not just at an ecological tipping point, but a social one, too. Brazil’s Indigenous people and the forests...
We are not just at an ecological tipping point, but a social one, too. Brazil’s Indigenous people and the forests they protect are facing annihilation.
If the Amazon rainforest alone is destroyed, the resulting carbon emissions could make it extremely difficult to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Burning fossil fuels is often seen as the only culprit in climate breakdown, but tropical deforestation is the second-largest source of carbon emissions in the world.
Even losing part of the Amazon could cause a tipping point where the forests no longer create enough rain to sustain themselves. This would cause droughts that would drive many species to extinction, devastate farming in the region and likely cause further violence.
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In the Australian winter, Pied Currawongs often form flocks and search out fruiting trees to raid. I set up my...
In the Australian winter, Pied Currawongs often form flocks and search out fruiting trees to raid. I set up my recording gear in front of a native Lilli Pilli tree in full fruit, and it was only a matter of time before the currawongs arrived and enjoyed one of their winter parties!
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This is a sample from the album 'Cape York: Melaleuca Swamp', recorded on the the edge of a remote melaleuca...
This is a sample from the album 'Cape York: Melaleuca Swamp', recorded on the the edge of a remote melaleuca (paperbark) swamp in Cape York, far northern Australia. The microphones were placed near the edge of the wetland, adjacent to dry tropical woodland and with an open lilypad-covered lagoon in the background. Throughout the album there is a nice natural mix of early morning sounds from wetland and woodland species in this unique landscape.

https://wildambience.com/albums/cape-york-melaleuca-swamp/
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In 15 years recording at Stossel creek in Washington I have never heard Pacific chorus frogs singing this early!
I...
In 15 years recording at Stossel creek in Washington I have never heard Pacific chorus frogs singing this early!
I have extensive data of this site, this is an audio box that is left bungie-corded to a tree at the side of a pond.
Signs of global changes right here!
Recordist: martyn stewart
Recorder: Wildlife acoustics
Location: Stossel creek road
Date: February 12th 2017
Temp: 37f
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3 minute audio sample from the 79 minute nature sound album; "The Whistlers of Kolombangara", available for download...
3 minute audio sample from the 79 minute nature sound album; "The Whistlers of Kolombangara", available for download from http://www.listeningearth.com/LE/product.php?id=110

The song of the Golden Whistlers of the Solomon Islands is one of nature's marvels.

This recording takes you to the island of Kolombangara to experience their melodic, rhythmic (and very loud!) voices reverberating through the rainforests that cloak the island's volcanic flanks.

We begin predawn, with a hypnotic chorus of frogs and insects in the tropical night. Suddenly a Whistler breaks the calm with an exuberant ripple of sound that sends a shiver up the spine. From then on there's no stopping him, as he pours out a sequence of percussive melodies at high volume.

As the day moves on, the whistlers ease back, and a variety of birdsong filters down from the forest canopy - Lorikeets, Mynahs, Flycatchers, Hornbills, White-eyes, Pigeons, Cockatoos - along with the gentle buzz of diurnal insects.

With the afternoon, we hear one of the other unusual voices of these forests; the harsh growls and booming calls of the Buff-headed Coucal. A Whistler gives some last calls as the light begins to fade and the electric vibration of dusk cicadas fills the air. After dark, the forest is filled with frogs once again, this time a multitude of chiming 'Koni' frogs.
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